People

Faculty

Peter Alagona

Associate Professor & Director of IPEES

alagona@es.ucsb.edu

 

Bio

After earning his PhD at UCLA in 2006, Professor Alagona completed postdoctoral fellowships at Harvard and Stanford universities. Since arriving at UCSB in 2009, he has received several awards, including a National Science Foundation CAREER grant and the Harold J. Plous Award for the UCSB College of Letters and Science’s most outstanding junior faculty member. Alagona is the author of more than three-dozen publications in the areas of environmental history, geography, philosophy, and policy—including After the Grizzly: Endangered Species and the Politics of Place in California (UC Press, 2013).

Specialization

Environmental History, History of Science, Wildlife and Endangered Species, and California

Education

Ph.D., History, University of California, Los Angeles M.A., History, University of California Los Angeles M.A., Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara B.A., History, Northwestern University

Research

Peter Alagona's research focuses on the histories of land use, natural resource management, environmental politics, and ecological science in the North American West and beyond. He has particular interests in endangered species and biological diversity, and he is developing a new research and teaching initiative on the history of ideas about environmental change.

Endangered Species: For the past decade, most of my research has focused on the histories of wildlife and endangered species in California and the American West. This work produced a series of essays and a book, After the Grizzly, published by UC Press in 2013.

Steelhead: Over the past three years, I have worked on several research projects related to the history steelhead, a federally listed endangered fish species, along the West Coast of the United States.

Biological Field Stations: I am currently conducting a collaborative, interdisciplinary project that uses the UC Natural Reserve System as a case study to explore the role of biological field stations in American environmental history, from 1950 to 2010.

Environmental Change:  I am currently developing a new research and teaching initiative on the history of ideas about environmental change. 

Liz Carlisle

Assistant Professor

carlisle@es.ucsb.edu

 

Liz Carlisle is an Assistant Professor in the Environmental Studies Program at University of California, Santa Barbara, where her work focuses on fostering a more just and sustainable food system. She holds a Ph.D. in Geography from UC Berkeley and a B.A. in Folklore and Mythology from Harvard University, and she formerly served as Legislative Correspondent for Agriculture and Natural Resources in the Office of U.S. Senator Jon Tester. Recognized for her academic publishing with the Elsevier Atlas Award, which honors research with social impact, Liz has also written numerous pieces for general audience readers, in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Business Insider, and Stanford Social Innovation Review. She is the author of two books about transition to sustainable farming: Lentil Underground (winner of the 2016 Montana Book Award) and Grain by Grain, coauthored with farmer Bob Quinn.

Specialization

Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems, Regenerative and Organic Agriculture, Food and Agricultural Policy

Education

2015 Ph.D. Geography, University of California, Berkeley

2006 B.A. Folklore and Mythology, Harvard University

Research

Dr. Carlisle's research program focuses on sustainability transition in the food system, and she works closely with farmers to understand both barriers and opportunities for scaling out agroecological management of farmland.

Jordan Clark

Professor

jfclark@geol.ucsb.edu

 

Dr. Jordan Clark's research is focused on understanding hydrological and geochemical interactions that occur near the earth's surface and the effects of external anthropogenic and climatic forcing on these interactions. He uses geochemical tracers (both trace solutes and isotopes) in his investigations of earth surface processes. During the last decade, isotope hydrology as a sub-field has matured significantly and can now be used to addresses a significant number of new problems relating to hydrology and near surface processes.

He believes it is important to work on fundamental aspects of regional environmental problems and I spend a considerable amount of time on this type of research. His graduate studies on the Hudson River and, more recently, his research on Aquifer Storage and Recovery in California and aspects of the study on natural marine hydrocarbon seepage are examples of this effort. The remainder of his research time is spent examining geochemical problems related to global cycles and climate change (both recent and glacial/interglacial). His research on the hydrochemistry of springs, paleo-proxy data stored in groundwater, and methane emissions from hydrocarbon seepage illustrate this effort. Although his work examines problems in different environments, it is united by a common set of questions: how do transport processes affect water chemistry and quality and what are the impacts of climate change and other anthropogenic forcing on water chemistry and flow.

Specialization

Geochemistry, Hydrologic Sciences, Tracer Hydrology and Environmental Geology

Education

Ph.D., Columbia University

Research

Research interests lie in the general field of aqueous geochemistry and center on:

  1. the transport of water and dissolved material in groundwater, surface waters, and the coastal ocean 
  2. how flow patterns affect water quality
  3. gas exchange across the air-water interface
  4. climate change during the last 30,000 yr

These questions are examined using experiments conducted by introducing chemical tracers into the water bodies, plus analysis of flow patterns, residence times, and mixing rates inferred from the distribution of natural and anthropogenic tracers.

Carla D'Antonio

Schuyler Professor

dantonio@es.ucsb.edu

 

Dr. Carla D'Antonio's teaching is in the area of ecology and the application of ecological knowledge to environmental problem solving. She is particularly passionate about teaching courses that get students out into the field to evaluate real world ecosystem management problems and to apply knowledge.

Teaching: Dr. Carla D'Antonio's teaching is in the area of ecology and the application of ecological knowledge to environmental problem-solving. She is particularly passionate about teaching courses that get students out into the field to evaluate real-world ecosystem or species management problems and to apply knowledge acquired in the classroom to solving conservation problems. Her field course ES/EEMB 119, involves field trips each week to visit a variety of ecosystem and measure things about those systems. Students meet with managersto hear first hand about the challenges and conflicts they face balancing human uses with species conservation. Other teaching includes Foundations of Ecosystem Restoration and Fire Ecology both of which also have a strong field component.

Campus activities: D'Antonio is on the oversight committee of the Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration (CCBER) and on the Science Advisory Committee for the North Campus Open Space restoration project. She is also on the UCSB Natural Reserve System?s oversight committees, and serves as the Faculty Representative for Sedgwick Reserve. She is active on the ES Planning Committee and the ES Bren-Joint Affairs Committee and the Greenhouse Committee.

Specialization

Plant and Ecosystem Ecology, Invasive Species, Species Affects on Ecosystem Processes, and Restoration Ecology

Education

Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara

Research

Dr. Carla D'Antonio's research focus has been to understand processes that control invasions by non-indigenous species into ecological communities and how and when the addition of some individual species affects ecosystem structure and functioning. She seeks a mechanistic understanding of ecological patterns and process and although she works primarily at the community and ecosystem levels, she also examines individual plant and population processes. She believes that such an integrated approach is the best way to answer questions about the importance of individual species and how communities and ecosystems will change with increasing human population pressure, increasing movement of plant species, nitrogen deposition and climatic fluctuations. She also tries to link research questions and findings to the restoration or of community and ecosystem processes in degraded ecosystems. Research in her laboratory has focused on understanding both controls over vegetation change and plant dominance from local to landscape levels. Her students work in chaparral, grassland and vernal pool ecosystems and she continues to work with students and collaborators in Hawaii on factors inhibiting forest recovery after the cessation of livestock grazing. Her work and that of her students integrates with land managers at the UC NRS sites, Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge in Hawaii, and with the USFS. Some specific projects near Santa Barbara include collaborative work on plant community responses to wildfire and invasive grasses in California chaparral, factors impeding natural recovery of chaparral after degradation due to too much fire, and factors influencing recovery of the endemic conifer Pseudotsuga macrocarpa after fire and drought. At Sedgwick she maintains plots in the international Nutrient network study http://www.nutnet.umn.edu). Annually she measure biomass and compositional responses to N, P and micronutrient fertilization as well as maintaining a litter manipulation and native plant seeding experiment that is cross with the fertilization treatments. She also maintains a site in Sedgwick grasslands that are part of the International Drought Experiment (https://wp.natsci.colostate.edu/droughtnet/activities/international-drou...).

Ranjit Deshmukh

Assistant Professor

rdeshmukh@ucsb.edu

 

Ranjit Deshmukh is an Assistant Professor in the Environmental Studies department at the University of California Santa Barbara. Ranjit’s research interests lie at the intersection of energy, environment, and economics, specifically in low carbon energy systems, clean energy access, and electricity markets.

Prior to joining the University of California Santa Barbara, Ranjit was an ITRI-Rosenfeld postdoctoral fellow at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Ranjit holds a PhD in Energy and Resources from the University of California at Berkeley, master’s degrees in

Engineering from Humboldt State University and University of Texas at Austin, and a bachelor’s degree from the Government College of Engineering Pune, India. He was a Siebel Scholar and a Link Energy fellow while at UC Berkeley and a Schatz Energy fellow at Humboldt State University.

Specialization

Energy systems and policy analysis; electricity sector planning, operations, and markets; geospatial analysis of energy resources; energy access in developing regions

Education

2016 Ph.D., Energy and Resources, University of California at Berkeley

2008 M.S., Environmental Systems, Humboldt State University, California

2001 M.S., Manufacturing Systems Engineering, University of Texas at Austin

1998 B.E., Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, Pune, India

Research

Ranjit is broadly interested in low carbon energy systems and clean energy access. Specifically, his key interests include: 1) strategies, policies, and market mechanisms for renewable energy integration in electric power systems, 2) incorporating multiple techno-economic, social, and environmental criteria for sustainable energy system planning, 3) technologies and incentives for increasing access to clean energy services in developing regions and low income communities. Ranjit’s work has taken him to India, Indonesia, and several countries in Africa. In pursuing his academic and applied research, he works closely with both government and non-government stakeholders including regulators, electric utilities, government ministries, non-profit organizations, and local communities.

Low carbon electricity system planning and operations
With abundant resources and declining costs, both wind and solar technologies have the potential to significantly decarbonize our energy systems. However, their large-scale deployment introduces challenges in operating and planning future electricity systems and may conflict with social and environmental objectives. With high spatial and temporal resolution models, Ranjit examines the impacts of wind and solar technologies and develops strategies to minimize those impacts.

In collaboration with colleagues, Ranjit is developing an open-source modeling platform for planning cost-effective investments, ensuring reliable operations, and enabling efficient markets for future low-carbon electricity systems. Under this research area, he is co-leading projects in both India and Southern Africa.

In the past, Ranjit co-led a renewable energy grid integration study to model India’s power system, and analyze operational and market strategies to integrate high shares of wind and solar generation. This study was a collaboration between the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Power Systems Operations Corporation of India and was supported by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

Planning and prioritizing wind and solar resources
Ranjit co-leads the development of the Multi-criteria Analysis for Planning Renewable Energy (MapRE) platform – an open-source data and tools platform, which enables the identification and valuation of spatially-explicit, cost-effective but environmentally and socially sustainable wind and solar resources across large geographical regions. Ranjit’s projects have focused on countries in eastern and southern Africa and in India.

His ongoing projects include applying MapRE to countries in the Southern African Power Pool to understand priorities of different stakeholders in planning wind and solar plants and identifying resources that best meet multiple stakeholder criteria. MapRE tools continue to be used by researchers at the World Bank and other academic institutions for planning renewable energy deployment in several countries including Bangladesh, Vietnam, Nicaragua, and Afghanistan.
Website: mapre.lbl.gov

Clean Energy Access
Globally, almost a billion people do not have access to electricity and about 2.7 billion people lack access to clean cooking options. Declining costs and increasing efficiencies of technologies including light-emitting diodes (LEDs), solar photovoltaics, battery storage, and induction cookstoves have the potential to provide access to clean energy services to those who lack access.

Under this research area, Ranjit’s ongoing projects include understanding incentives and mechanisms that would encourage adoption of energy efficient lighting and other appliances in low income households in developing countries. His previous research efforts focused on analyzing policies to encourage deployment and ensure sustainable operation of renewable energy-based mini-grids.

Climate-Water-Energy Nexus in low carbon systems
This is a new area of research. We are exploring the interactions between climate, water, and energy, specifically in future low carbon systems. Our initial geographical focus is California.

Halley Froehlich

Assistant Professor

froehlich@es.ucsb.edu

 

Dr. Froehlich earned her BSc in Animal Biology from the University of California, Davis and her PhD in Marine Ecology & Fishery Sciences from the University of Washington, where she took an interdisciplinary approach studying the impacts of anthropogenic stressors, such as hypoxia, on exploited marine ecosystems and species. As a Postdoctoral Scholar at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, she studied the potential of sustainable offshore aquaculture. Dr. Froehlich started her Interdepartmental Graduate Program in Marine Science (IGPMS) appointment in 2019, joining the departments of Ecology, Evolution, & Marine Biology and Environmental Studies. She is currently a co-PI on several cross-departmental seafood and aquaculture projects.

Specialization

Marine Ecology, Aquaculture, Fisheries, Climate Change, Ecological Modeling, Data Science, Environmental Physiology and Behavior, Social science

Education

Ph.D., Marine Ecology & Fishery Sciences, University of Washington

B.S., Animal Biology, University of California, Davis

Research

Sustainability of seafood and marine ecosystems are increasingly threatened by multiple stressors that act and interact at different scales. Globally, aquaculture (i.e., aquatic farming) is now a dominant form of seafood production, but there are major scientific gaps in understanding the consequences of aquatic farming in a larger, ecological food-system context, especially under a changing climate. In the Froehlich Lab, research aims to tackle these problems by understanding the links between patterns and process at the species to global scale, using field- and lab-based physiology and behavior analyses, combined with social and ecological modelling and data science. Currently, the Froehlich lab is exploring interactions and impacts of aquaculture, wild fisheries, and climate change.

Helene Gardner

(LSOE) - Lecturer with Security of Employment

hkgardner@es.ucsb.edu

 

Former UCSB ES Program Lecturer--now newly hired as the ES Program's first (LPSOE) Lecturer with Potential Security of Employment in the area of environmental chemistry, pollution and toxicology. Helene K. Gardner, received her Ph.D. in environmental toxicology from the University of Rochester in 1987. There she worked on projects involving the covalent binding of diethylstilbestrol (DES) to maternal and fetal tissues, the female reproductive effects of uranyl fluoride, the nephrotoxicity of inhaled uranyl fluoride, and the effects of inhaled nitrogen dioxide on vitamin E transport and tissue distribution.

Dr. Gardner has worked in integrated pest management, researched the presence of toxicants in human breast milk, analyzed the environmental impact statements of energy transportation development, evaluated the use of hazardous waste in recycled glass products, and developed applications for air permits and economic development funds. She has an extensive background in assessing the risk to human health of brown fields, landfills, and commercial sites, especially with respect to their impact on groundwater. Most recently she has commented on proposals for monitoring wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent for contaminants of emerging concern, water plans, recycled water initiatives, classification and contamination of beaches, and overall efforts to reduce contamination of the ocean. She has worked with numerous nonprofit organizations, engineering firms, and businesses.

Her background in teaching is as diverse as her scientific experience. She has taught courses in chemistry and/or biology at Simon’s Rock College (an experimental early liberal arts college), private secondary schools, in special education at Santa Barbara High School, in the credit-free program at Santa Barbara City College, and in the home setting. She enjoys being with her children, writing, paddle sports, beachcombing and tidepooling, drawing, and almost all genres of music, especially the blues.    

Specialization

Environmental Toxicology, Environmental Chemistry, Air Quality and Pollution

Education

Ph.D., University of Rochester

Summer Gray

Assistant Professor

summer_gray@ucsb.edu

 

Summer Gray is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies at UC Santa Barbara, where she teaches courses on infrastructure, adaptation, and the environment. She is also a founding member of the Climate Justice Project at UC Santa Barbara and a DIY filmmaker. Prior to joining the Environmental Studies Program in 2017, she was a UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Anthropology at UC Santa Cruz.

Speicalization

Environment and Society, Infrastructure and Adaptation, Climate Justice Studies

Education

Ph.D., Sociology, University of California, Santa Barbara

M.A., Sociology, University of California, Santa Barbara

B.A., Science, Technology, and Society, Pomona College

Research

Summer’s research is focused on connecting practices of shoreline stabilization with the emerging and uneven geographies of sea change, especially in low-lying countries and island nations. Her work highlights the lived experiences of coastal communities throughout the world facing the threat of sea change and the unintended consequences of coastal development and sand mining.

Robert Heilmayr

Assistant Professor

rheilmayr@es.ucsb.edu

 

Professor Heilmayr joined the Environmental Studies Program as an Assistant Professor in 2016. He was a postdoctoral fellow in the Carlson Lab in the University of Hawaii’s Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management and earned his Ph.D. from the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program for Environment and Resources at Stanford University. His nonacademic career has stretched from field botany in the Sierra Nevada to climate policy analysis and advocacy in Washington, DC. 

Specialization

Environmental Economics, Ecological Economics, Land Systems Science

Education

Ph.D., Environment and Resources, Stanford University

M.A., Economics, Stanford University

B.A., Environmental Studies, Economics and Politics, Claremont McKenna College

Research

As an interdisciplinary environmental scientist, Robert Heilmayr combines approaches from economics, geography and ecology to explore the way society uses and governs natural resources.

Reducing deforestation through nonstate governance

Global markets for agricultural products, timber and minerals are critically important drivers of deforestation. However, there is increasing hope that the global supply chains driving land use change may also provide unique opportunities to halt deforestation. Market campaigns, deforestation moratoria and certification schemes have all been promoted as powerful tools to achieve conservation goals. Despite the excitement about such nonstate, market-driven (NSMD) governance regimes, there have been relatively few opportunities to quantify their ability to deliver on promised conservation outcomes. By combining remote sensing and econometrics, I have quantified the impacts of nonstate governance in diverse production systems including Chile's timber sector and palm oil production in Southeast Asia. 

Impacts of plantation forestry

Historically, natural forests provided society with all of its timber and fiber. However, the past half-century has seen a rapid shift towards reliance on intensively managed, planted forests. Having expanded at a rate of five million hectares per year for the past decade, planted forests now constitute more than seven percent of all forests and produce more than half of the world’s roundwood. Environmental optimists often express a hope that the rapid expansion of plantations has the potential to dramatically reduce pressure on natural forests. However, case studies conducted in countries experiencing rapid plantation expansion often highlight the risk of direct conversion of natural forests to plantations. This conflict highlights two important interactions between plantations and natural forests: plantation forests compete for land with natural forests, but they can also ease demand for forest products from natural forests. My research uses a combination of theoretical microeconomic models and remote sensing to explore the impact of plantation forest expansion on natural ecosystems.

Land use change in Chile

Whereas forests throughout much of the global South were exposed to widespread deforestation at the end of the 20th Century, Chile experienced an expansion in tree cover. As one of the only South American countries to experience such a forest transition, careful analysis of Chile's experience may yield lessons to guide the creation of effective policies to slow deforestation elsewhere. Working with collaborators at the Universidad de Concepción's Laboratorio de Ecología de Paisaje, I have developed high resolution maps of Chilean land use change between 1986 and 2011. We have used these maps to quantify the impacts of public and private policies on land use change, as well as assess the ecological changes that have occurred across the landscape.

Edward Keller

Professor

keller@geol.ucsb.edu

 

Edward Keller is one of the foremost experts on tectonic geomorphology especially with regard to earthquake reduction and prevention. By studying relative uplift and subsidence both in terms of rates and elevation changes, tectonic movements and their extent and intensity may be revealed. The beautiful wave cut terraces of the California Pacific coast are excellent examples of the types of features that Keller studies. They reveal sequential tectonic uplift of the land surface with erosion during the quiet periods. Such studies can reveal information on recurrence intervals for earthquakes, potential for blind faults, as well as landslides and other hazards. They have great implications for building codes and disaster preparedness plans.  Keller primarily studies the geomorphology and Quaternary deposits related to active faults and folds that result from faults. 

Edward Keller also has a major interest in fluvial geomorphology. He studies the development of channels in streams as well as the controls on where pools and riffles develop and how they change with time. This research involves an attempt to explain and even quantify a process that is otherwise chaotic in appearance. In addition to determining location of the features of a stream, Keller studies the processes involved in to flood control. Currently, as an offshoot of this research, he has been studying the hydrologic processes in the chaparral ecosystem of southern California and role of wildfire in the recurrence of high magnitude flood deposits and debris flow deposits. 

Edward Keller has over 20 years experience in public service and consulting in a variety of subjects and cases including:  flood hazard; erosion; coastal processes; landslides; and landscape history. This work has provided real world experience to both undergraduate and graduate students. He earned a Ph.D. from Purdue University, Indiana in Geology in 1973. He joined the faculty at the University of North Carolina the same year. In 1976, he accepted a position at the University of California at Santa Barbara (joint appointment with the Environmental Studies Program and the Department of Earth Science) and has remained there ever since. He has served as Chair of both the Environmental Studies and the Hydrologic Science programs several times. Edward Keller has had a very productive career. He is an author on some 100 articles in international journals, governmental reports and professional volumes. Many of these are seminal works on fluvial processes and tectonic geomorphology. Even more impressive are the books that he has written. He is the author of the most successful textbook on Environmental Geology (with the same name) now in its eighth edition. He also wrote the definitive textbook on tectonic geomorphology entitled Active Tectonics and is in its second printing. He is the author with Daniel Botkin of a very successful textbook on Environmental Science (with the same name). He is also an author on two other books on Environmental Science and Geology. Keller has received several honors and awards for his contributions to the profession. He received a Hartley Visiting Professor Award from The University of Southampton, England in 1982-1983 and the Quatercentenary Fellowship from Cambridege University, England in 2000. He two Outstanding Alumnus Awards from Purdue University, Indiana, one from the department (1994) and one from the School of Science (1996). He also received a Distinguished Alumnus Award from California State University at Fresno in 1998. He received the Outstanding Research Award from the Southern California Earthquake Center in 1999. Professor Keller received the Don J Easterbrook, Distinguished Scientist Award from the Geological Society of America in 2004.

1. Updated from Gates, A. E. 2003. Notable Scientists: A to Z of Earth Scientists. Facts on File Inc. NY, NY.

Specialization

Environmental and Engineering Geology, and Geomorphology

Education

P.h.D., Geology, Purdue University 

M.S., Geology, University of California

B.A., Geology, California State University, Fresno 

B.S., Mathematics, California State University, Fresno 

Research

Dr. Keller's research efforts are divided into two areas of surface processes: 1) study of stream and river form and process 2) studies of Quaternary stratigraphy and tectonics as they relate to earthquake hazard, landslides, active folding and mountain building. River studies focus on: 1) Basic river processes associated with channel form, sediment sorting and routing, and sediment budgets; 2) The role of wildfire and the recurrence intervals of high magnitude flood deposits and debris flow deposits; 3) Role of large woody debris and other large roughness elements on channel form and process; 4) Environmental effects of channelization; 5) River restoration and management; 6) flood hazard evaluation; and 7) Understanding of ecologic factors associated with the  habitat for the endangered southern California steelhead trout.  This work has been mostly funded by the Water Resources Center at the University of California, Riverside. My research in active tectonics has centered on the western Transverse Ranges of southern California.  The objectives of that research are: 1) Establish the late Pleistocene through Holocene chronology; 2) Estimate rates of recent tectonic activity; 3) Determine the basic tectonic framework of the western Transverse Ranges; 4) Provide a better understanding of mountain-building processes in active fold-and-thrust belts; 5) Understand fault and fold growth, particularly lateral propagation 6) Understand the earthquake hazard of the Santa Barbara area; and Understand the La Conchita landslide hazard. Funding for active tectonic studies has come from the U. S. Geological Survey’s Earthquakes Reduction Program, the Southern California Earthquake Center, and the National Science Foundation.

Dr. Keller is currently working on research that measures coastal erosion rates before, during and after El Nino (LiDAR)

Jennifer Martin

(LPSOE) - Lecturer with Potential Security of Employment

jennifermartin@es.ucsb.edu

 

Specialization

Environmental History, Oceans, History of Science

Research

Martin’s research and teaching areas include environmental history, history of science, and the oceans. After completing her Ph.D. in history at the University of Wisconsin—Madison, she was a Postdoctoral Fellow for an interdisciplinary Mellon Sawyer Seminar at the University of California, Santa Barbara. One result of that collaboration is a forthcoming article, “What is Marine Justice “in the Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, for which she served as lead author.

David Pellow

Program Chair and Dehlsen Professor

pellow@es.ucsb.edu

 

Professor David N. Pellow is the Dehlsen and Department Chair of Environmental Studies and Director of the Global Environmental Justice Project at the University of California, Santa Barbara where he teaches courses on environmental and social justice, race/class/gender and environmental conflict, human-animal conflicts, sustainability, and social change movements that confront our socioenvironmental crises and social inequality. He has volunteered for and served on the Boards of Directors of several community-based, national, and international organizations that are dedicated to improving the living and working environments for people of color, immigrants, indigenous peoples, and working class communities, including the Global Action Research Center, the Center for Urban Transformation, the Santa Clara Center for Occupational Safety and Health, Global Response, Greenpeace USA, and International Rivers.

Specialization

Environmental Justice Studies, Race and Ethnic Studies, Social Change, and Social Movements

Education

Ph.D., Sociology, Northwestern University

M.A., Sociology, Northwestern University

B.A., Sociology, summa cum laude, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Research

Pellow’s research has included:

  1. Supervising a group of UCSB students in developing a Green New Deal for California's Central Coast region in collaboration with the Central Coast Climate Justice Network;
  2. Leading a collaboration between UCSB and the Central Coast Climate Justice Network to advance our knowledge base concerning fossil fuel development projects in the region and to support campaigns that promote energy and climate justice;
  3. A study of how environmental privilege and environmental racism shape the local ecology and life chances of native born and immigrant residents of Aspen and Colorado’s Roaring Fork Valley;
  4. A study of radical environmental and animal rights movements’ goals, successes and failures, and the impact of government repression on these activists who are frequently labeled “eco-terrorists.”
  5. A study on conflicts over the disproportionate location of garbage dumps and incinerators in communities of color in Chicago from the 1880s to the 2000s 6. A study of immigrant and working class laborers and environmental justice activists who pushed Silicon Valley companies to become more attentive to demands for sustainability, environmental justice, and occupational safety and health

Dr. Pellow is the director of the Global Environmental Justice Project. For more information, please click here

Debra Perrone

Assistant Professor

perrone@ucsb.edu

 

Debra Perrone is an Assistant Professor of UCSB’s Environmental Studies Program. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of California, Debra was a postdoctoral research scholar at Stanford University with a dual appointment in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Woods Institute for the Environment. She received her PhD in Environmental Engineering at Vanderbilt University in 2014 and was awarded first honors as the Graduate School’s Founder’s Medalist. Debra has been awarded fellowships from the Environmental Protection Agency and National Science Foundation for her work studying the growing water scarcity challenges and tradeoffs facing society. Deb integrates research methods from engineering, physical science, and law to inform water sustainability and policy; she uses a wide-spectrum of outlets to disseminate her research, including peer-reviewed journals, policy briefs, and interactive-online dashboards. Debra is a co-author of a textbook for undergraduate students that focuses on the challenges and opportunities surrounding our global water resources by providing a foundation in water science and policy. 

Specialization

Water Resources Engineering, Groundwater Science and Policy

Education

2014 Ph.D., Environmental Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee

2010 M.S., Environmental Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee

2008 B.S., Civil and Environmental Engineering, Lafayette College, Easton, Pennsylvania

Research

For a full list of publications, please visit Dr. Perrone's website.

Simone Pulver

Associate Professor

pulver@es.ucsb.edu

 

Dr. Simone Pulver arrived at UC Santa Barbara as an Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies in 2009. Before coming to UCSB, she was a research professor at Brown University's Watson Institute for International Studies and the Center for Environmental Studies. She received her doctorate in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley and also hold an M.A. in Energy and Resources from UC Berkeley, as well as a BA in Physics from Princeton University. 

Professional Associations, Awards, etc.

  • American Sociological Association
  • International Studies Association
  • "Distinguished Mentor” for the post-doctoral socio-environmental immersion program at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) at the University of Maryland
  • UCSB Faculty Sustainability Champion 2018-2019

Specialization

Business and the Environment; Global Environmental Politics; Socio-Environmental Systems; Environmental Sociology

Education

Ph.D., Sociology, University of California, Berkeley

M.A., Energy and Resources, University of California, Berkeley

B.A., Physics, Princeton University

Research

Simone Pulver's research focuses broadly on the intersection of economic action and environmental harm and seeks to integrate theoretical frameworks related to global governance, organizational theory, and economic and environmental sociology.  Specifically, she has led NSF-funded research projects investigating oil industry responses to climate change, climate politics in Mexico, and low carbon investments by firms in Brazil and India.  She is currently directing two new projects; one that explores changes over time in the production of pollution in the manufacturing sector in the US and the other focusing on responses to uncertainty in climate adaptation.

Joshua Schimel

Professor, Associate Dean of MLPS

schimel@lifesci.ucsb.edu

 

Specialization

Terrestrial Ecosystem Ecology, Microbial Ecology, and Organismal Ecology

Education

University of California, Berkeley

Research

Schimel's research sits at the interface of ecosystem and microbial ecology. He is interested in the role of soil microbes in controlling ecosystem scale processes. He is particularly interested in the linkages between plant and soil processes, and how changes in microbial community structure affects ecosystem-scale dynamics. His work is now focusing on three ecosystems: the Arctic tundra in Alaska, the taiga forest of Alaska, and the California annual grassland-oak savanna.

Dr. Josh Schimel's work in the Arctic is focused on understanding the dynamics of soil organic matter. He describes his project in the Arctic below:
The Arctic is important in global climate since there is a lot of C stored in arctic soils and the Arctic is warming faster than the rest of the world. Increased temperatures could cause greater release of C into the atmosphere, producing a positive feedback on global climate. Alternatively, nutrient release from soil organic matter could enhance plant growth, making the Arctic a stronger sink for atmospheric CO2, and producing a negative feedback on climate. Which of these processes is more important depends on the nature of soil organic matter, its bioavailability, and what happens to the nutrients that are made available by decomposition. Within this framework I have projects studying the bioavailability of tundra soil C and N and how that varies throughout the year. 

One important piece of understanding the Arctic is winter. Winter is long and cold, but it is not biologically dead. Winter activity accounts for a significant portion of total annual respiration, and may account for all of the annual net C efflux. Nitrogen cycling under the snow may also be important in supplying nitrogen to plants. We actually know very little about the controls on microbial activity in freezing and frozen soils. This project is part of the ATLAS (Arctic Transitions in the Land-Atmosphere System) program; a component of the NSF Polar Programs, Land-Atmosphere-Ice Interactions program. This is a large, interdisciplinary program focused on understanding the Arctic as an integrated system, with strongly interacting physical and biological components. 

In California a major program is targeted at understanding the functioning of California annual grassland oak savanna/woodland ecosystems. Within this larger direction, I have two project thrusts. One is focusing on plant soil interactions and how changing plant communities interact with changing soil processes, particular nitrogen cycling. In particular we are interested in the effect of the annual grasses that invaded California starting over 100 years ago. How much of their success is through changing soil conditions? We are working with Dr. Jim Reichman, Eric Seabloom, and Oliver Chadwick on this work. The other thrust is understanding how stress (drying/rewetting) and resource availability through the soil profile regulate microbial diversity, community composition, and community function. This project is basic microbial ecology and includes work using molecular tools to understand the dynamics of specific microbial populations.

Lisa Sideris

Professor

lsideris@ucsb.edu

 

Lisa H. Sideris is Professor of Environmental Studies at UC Santa Barbara. Before coming to UCSB, she taught in the Religious Studies Department at Indiana University, the Faculty of Religious Studies and School of the Environment at McGill University in Montreal, and the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at Pace University in New York City. She teaches a variety of courses in environmental ethics, science and religion, and nature spirituality, as well as courses focused on the emerging ethical issues of the Anthropocene. She is author of Environmental Ethics, Ecological Theology, and Natural Selection, and Consecrating Science: Wonder, Knowledge, and the Natural World, and co-editor of a collection of interdisciplinary essays on the life and work of environmental pioneer Rachel Carson, titled Rachel Carson: Legacy and Challenge.

Specialization

Environmental Ethics, Religion and Nature, Environmental Humanities, Science and Religion

Education

Ph.D., Religious Studies, Indiana University (Critical and Ethical Studies)

M.A., Religious Studies, Indiana University

B.A., Bioanthropology/History & Philosophy of Science, Indiana University 

Research

Dr. Sideris’s research focuses broadly on the ethical significance of natural processes, and the way in which “environmental” values are captured, or obscured, by narratives and perspectives from religion and the sciences. Her recent research examines the role of wonder in contemporary scientific discourse and its impact on how humans conceive of and relate to nature. She is especially interested in the mythic, religious, and ethical dimensions of the so-called Anthropocene and its attendant technologies, such as geoengineering and de-extinction. The overarching question that drives her research is how to articulate a vision of the human that is appropriate to the environmental challenges we collectively face. She is actively involved in a number of international research initiatives in the environmental humanities, and serves as President-Elect of the International Society for the Study of Religion, Nature, and Culture.

Grace Wu

Assistant Professor

gracecwu@ucsb.edu

 

Grace Wu is an Assistant Professor in the Environmental Studies Program at UC Santa Barbara. Before joining UCSB, Grace was a Smith Conservation Fellow at The Nature Conservancy and the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis. She was also a UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow at the John Muir Institute of the Environment at UC Davis. She was trained in systems thinking and interdisciplinary approaches in the Energy and Resources Group at UC Berkeley.

Specialization

Sustainable Land Use, Climate Change Mitigation, Renewable Energy Planning, Land Systems Science

Education

  • Ph.D., Energy and Resources, University of California, Berkeley
  • M.S.., Energy and Resources, University of California, Berkeley
  • M.Phil., Zoology, University of Cambridge
  • B.A., Biology, Pomona College

Research

Grace is interested in the dynamics and drivers of land use change, climate change mitigation, and advancing our ability to plan for sustainable, multi-use landscapes that protect biodiversity and advance climate goals. She uses spatial science approaches to identify and understand the co-benefits and trade-offs between climate solutions and habitat conservation. Her current main research areas are (1) sustainable spatial planning of low carbon energy systems; and (2) designing policy, management, and technology pathways to sustainable land systems.

Spatial planning of low-carbon transitions
Her recent work is focused on understanding the role and impacts of land-based climate change mitigation strategies like renewable energy and transmission infrastructure expansion to achieve ambitious net zero climate targets in the United States. The rapid transition to low-carbon energy systems is paramount in the fight against climate change, and renewable energy is an integral component of this transition. However, renewable energy development could have significant land use requirements and impacts, and land conflicts could in turn stymie progress towards this low-carbon future. Grace works closely with science and policy teams at The Nature Conservancy to assess whether and how renewable energy infrastructure can be scaled up without negatively impacting areas of high conservation value. Grace’s prior work examining these issues for California have led to changes in state-level energy planning that better integrate land use and conservation considerations. Open source tools encourage the uptake of new approaches that help streamline sustainable energy and land use planning. Grace co-founded the Multi-criteria Analysis for Planning Renewable Energy (MapRE) initiative (http://mapre.lbl.gov) and developed the RE Zoning GIS tool to quickly and easily identify renewable energy development areas using multiple siting criteria in any region. Grace is involved in ongoing work that advances the MapRE framework in the Southern Africa region. The RE Zoning tool has been used in the analysis underpinning California’s integrated resource planning process and has been applied by teams at the World Bank in several countries around the world.

Sustainable land use pathways
There are inherent trade-offs in land use decisions, and achieving consensus or compromise among diverse stakeholders requires a framework for quantifying these trade-offs and identifying synergistic solutions. Working in partnership with the FABLE (Food, Agriculture, Biodiversity, Land Use, and Energy) consortium, Grace is working with collaborators on the US FABLE team to develop a land use planning framework for the US that is capable of assessing the impact and relative value of land intensive climate solutions like bioenergy and reforestation in comparison to other societal changes like shifts towards more sustainable diets or reduction in food waste.

Lecturers

Rita Bright

Lecturer

ritabright@ucsb.edu

 

Rita has been extensively involved in land use planning and policy and regulatory permitting with over 30 years of public agency and private consultant experience. As a former public planning agency manager, Rita managed community plan updates and the preparation of numerous program and project EIRs, often serving as the principal negotiator for numerous controversial and/or highly complex projects. Her specializations include environmental and policy analysis involving planning and zoning laws, implementation of ordinance and other legislative amendments, sea-level rise and adaptation planning, social equity, cannabis licensing studies, agricultural resource analysis, rural-urban interface, and neighborhood compatibility. In addition, she has substantial experience with permit processing, implementation and administration of urban and regional design programs, and environmental document preparation for a range of industrial and large-scale commercial development projects. Her responsibilities have included oversight and direction of substantial public outreach efforts, such as management of multiple citizen advisory bodies and stakeholders groups, extensive interface with multiple regulatory agencies, associated press relations, and presenting agency findings at public hearings.

Specialization

Sea-level Rise and Vulnerability, Coastal and Land Use Policy, Environmental Planning, Rural Resource Management, Urban Planning

Education

Graduate Studies in City Planning, San Diego State University

B.A., Environmental Studies and Business Economics, UC Santa Barbara

Research

Social Equity Analysis Report - City of Los Angeles; Sea-level Rise and Vulnerability Assessment - City of Carpinteria; General Plan and Coastal Land Use Plan Update - City of Carpinteria; Agricultural Element Implementation - County of Santa Barbara; Gaviota Coastal Resource Inventory - County of Santa Barbara; Rural Regions Plan - County of Santa Barbara

Agricultural Element Implementation - County of Santa Barbara; Gaviota Coastal Resource Inventory - County of Santa Barbara; Rural Regions Plan - County of Santa Barbara; Toro Canyon Regional Plan - County of Santa Barbara; Carpinteria Greenhouse Study - County of Santa Barbara; County of Santa Cruz Cannabis Licensing Program EIR - County of Santa Cruz; County of Santa Barbara Cannabis Licensing Program EIR - County of Santa Barbara; City of Los Angeles Cannabis Licensing CEQA Documentation - City of Los Angeles; County of Santa Barbara Utility-Scale Renewable Energy Ordinance Amendment Program EIR

Michael Brown

Lecturer

msbrownsb@gmail.com

 

Specialization

Sustainability Strategy, Goals, and Metrics, Technical Evaluation of Materials and Products, Program Development, and Sustainability Data Development

Education

Ph.D., Environmental Health, City and Regional Planning, Cornell University

A.B., Politics, University of California, Santa Cruz

Jolie Colby

Instructor of Record; Teaching Assistant, and Graduate Student Researcher

joliecolby@ucsb.edu

 

Jolie Colby is a Doctoral Candidate at UCSB’s Gevirtz Graduate School of Education. Jolie discovered her love of conservation and environmental literacy as a Fulbright scholar in Indonesia doing reef conservation. Before coming to UCSB, Jolie co-owned and operated a field study school in Central America that focused on neotropical conservation biology. For three years, Jolie was the Environmental Literacy Consultant for the UCSB Children’s Center and is currently the Lead Coordinator for UCSB’s Student Wildlife Ambassador Program, a core member of UCSB’s California Grizzly Research Network, and the Lead Developer for a conservation education group that develops project-based science curricula that meets NGSS standards. Jolie has worked with institutes such as The Nature Conservancy and the U.S. Department of State, in addition to collaborating directly with Jane Goodall, Jack Johnson, and various indigenous tribal leaders from around the world.

Jolie has served as Instructor of Record for:

  • ENV S 143: Endangered Species Management
  • ENV S 106: Critical Thinking and Evidence Based Reasoning,


Jolie has served as a Teaching Assistant for:

  • ENV S 1: Intro to Environmental Studies
  • ENV S 3: Intro to Social and Cultural Environments
  • ENV S 106: Critical Thinking and Evidence Based Reasoning

Specialization

Human dimensions of environmental change, Environmental literacy, Human wildlife coexistence, Conservation education, Endangered species management, NGSS curriculum development, Community conservation, Indigenous knowledge systems and the environment

Education

Ph.D., Education, University of California, Santa Barbara (2021)

M.A., Education, University of California, Santa Barbara

M.A., Philosophy, San Diego State University

B.A., Philosophy & German, Humboldt State University

Research

Jolie's current research explores the role of school communities in the possible reintroduction of grizzly bears to California. Jolie also focuses on the role teachers play in environmental literacy and works closely with teachers and schools to develop research based environmental literacy curriculum to science classrooms.

Thea Cremers

Continuing Lecturer

mcremers@att.net

 

Dr. Matthea Cremers interests focus on gender and the environment. She is a lecturer for the Environmental Studies Program and the Department of Anthropology.Dr. Cremers’ approach to teaching is truly interdisciplinary and, in every course, integrates elements of race, class, gender, and sustainability.  She is presently a lecturer in both Environmental Studies and Anthropology (including cross- listed courses) and has taught courses in Women’s Studies and Sociology. She also coordinates a year-long training program for Environmental Studies teaching assistants.

Connecting the university with the local community, she works as an internship coordinator and volunteer at the South Coast Railroad Museum at Goleta Depot. As a community activist, she was part of the successful effort to preserve the Ellwood Mesa and the Coronado Butterfly Preserve (and continues to be an active member of the advisory committee of the Land Trust for Santa Barbara Country). She prides herself in using her bicycle as a major source of transportation.  In her free time, she is a basket maker especially exploring the use of natural materials available in the local environment.  

Specialization

Gender and the Environment, Anthropology, Tourism, Environmental Justice and Human Environmental Rights

Education

  • Ph.D, University of California, Santa Barbara

Matt Fore

Lecturer

matthewfore@hotmail.com

 

Matt Fore has managed the Environmental Services Division since January of 2011, where he leads the team, keeps the media well-informed, and oversees strategic planning, contract management, and long-term solutions for solid waste. Before joining the City, Matt supervised the Solid Waste and Recycling Programs for Monterey County from 2006-2010. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Environmental Studies from UCSB, a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from San Jose State University, and is a Registered Environmental Health Specialist in the State of California. In his free time, Matt loads his twin boys into a backpack to explore a new trail.

Specialization

Waste Management, Conversion Technology, and Waste Characterization

Education

M.A., Public Administration, San Jose State University

B.A., Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara

Jeremy Jacobs

Lecturer

jjacobs9@gmail.com

 

Jeremy covers Western water, weather and legal issues for E&E News, where he has worked since February 2011. He has written about the Supreme Court, as well as a wide range of issues including the Clean Air Act, Superfund and chemical policy. He worked previously as a political reporter for National Journal, The Hill and The New York Observer. He's been a media fellow at the Vermont Law School and holds a graduate degree.

Specialization

Journalism, Communications, Legal Issues

Education

M.S. Columbia University Journalism School

B.A. with honors, Stanford University

Shithi Kamal-Heikman

Lecturer

shithi@es.ucsb.edu

 

Specialization

Physical Geography, Remote Sensing of the Environment, Snowmelt Modeling, Flood Hydrology, Rivers, Transboundary Water Sharing, Water Policy

Education

Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara

M.Sc., Cornell University

Manny Kundu

Lecturer

mkundu@es.ucsb.edu

 

Manny Kundu started teaching in the Environmental Studies Program in January 1988. He soon realized that teaching is not simply conveying information and explaining concepts to the students. To him, teaching became an effective method of learning. He felt that his learning was not complete until he was able to explain it to his students in a lucid manner. Since then he has viewed that the ultimate objective of his teaching is to enrich himself, not just my students. This is the core of his teaching philosophy.

Specialization

Anthropology, Global Environment and Population Studies

Education

Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara

Linda Krop

Continuing Lecturer

lkrop@cox.net

 

Linda Krop attended UCSB as an undergraduate, graduating in 1979 with a major in Psychology and a Minor in Coaching. After earning a J.D. and working at the Environmental Defense Center, she began guest lecturing in the Environmental Studies Program and other departments. She taught Environmental Law classes at the Santa Barbara College of Law and UCSB Extension before becoming an Instructor in the E.S. Program in 2006. She currently teaches Principles of Environmental Law and Planning and Zoning Law. She also supervises UCSB students who intern with the Environmental Defense Center.

Specialization

Environmental Law, Environmental Policy and Litigation

Education

B.A., Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara College of Law

Publications

Land Use and Planning Law (state and local laws relating to planning and permitting) How States Can Affect Federal Deepwater Port LNG Licensing Decisions: A Case Study Involving the Deepwater Port Act and the Coastal Zone Management Act, Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal, Symposium Edition, Vol. 5, Number 1 (Fall 2011)

Land Use and Planning Law (state and local laws relating to planning and permitting)Defending State’s Rights Under the Coastal Zone Management Act, Sustainable Development Law & Policy, American University Washington College of Law, Vol. VIII, Issue 1 (Fall 2007)

Bridget Lewin

Continuing Lecturer

lewin@es.ucsb.edu

 

Bridget Lewin holds an MA in Education with an emphasis in Instruction and the Use of Technology. She has been passionate about Environmental Education ever since she was a senior at UCSB in Environmental Studies. Before graduating with a BA in Environmental Studies-emphasis in Environmental Sciences-she co-organized an ES course with 9 other seniors and Dr. Rod Nash, in which she planned, taught, and assessed students in a discussion section on Environmental Education. This section included ES students planning and leading interpretive hikes for 60 local sixth graders during their local 3-day EE camping trip. Bridget then received a Single Subject Teaching credential (UCSB) in Life Sciences. After working as an educator in an Environmental Science Center in Houston, she returned to Santa Barbara to be a high school teacher for Anacapa School, teaching Ecology, Advanced Environmental Issues, AP Biology, Algebra and electives in Outdoor Leadership, Ultimate Frisbee and Sewing. While attending UCSB again to receive her MA, she began teaching the Secondary Science Methods and Procedures courses. After being asked to teach the Elementary Science Methods course, she worked closely with other instructors to combine the elementary methods courses within an integrated context. This became the subject for her PhD in Education—studying the UCSB Elementary Teacher Education Program as a Learning Organization and how change develops, is managed, and sustained.

In 1996, Bridget’s became a mother of a daughter and put her research on hold, while continuing to teach the Elementary and Secondary Science Methods courses. In 1993 she was asked to teach the Environmental Education course with the ES Program at UCSB (the class she had campaigned to create when she was graduating). She has been honored to teach this class and has continued to teach ES 127: Introduction to Environmental Education at UCSB ever since. In 2014, ES 127B was added to this course to provide students with a solid understanding of the theory of EE as well as continuing the opportunity for students to apply this understanding to their EE Practicum. This involves students planning, teaching, and assessing a complete EE unit in a local placement and with an audience of their choosing. Within this course, the definition of EE is broad; therefore ES 127 students have taught in a variety of placements, to a variety of audiences, and addressed a variety of environmental issues. Currently, Bridget also owns her own business and is a Science Education Consultant. She is currently working with Santa Barbara Unified School District as their elementary science consultant. She volunteers in her children’s schools and is a member of the Executive Board for the Wilderness Youth Project.

Specialization

Environmental Education, Learning Styles, and Instructional Methodologies

Education

M.Ed., University of California, Santa Barbara

Roland Lewin

Lecturer

roland.lewin@gmail.com

 

Roland Lewin is an award winning educator with over 28 years experience teaching economics and math within the Santa Barbara Unified School District. Lewin is an adjunct economics instructor at Santa Barbara City College.

Specialization

Environmental Economics, Environmental Policy, Economic Theory

Education

BA, Business Economics, UC Santa Barbara

MA, Business Economics, UC Santa Barbara

M.Ed, Education, UC Los Angeles

Julie Maldonado

Lecturer

jkmaldonado@ucsb.edu

 

Julie Maldonado is Associate Director for the Livelihoods Knowledge Exchange Network (LiKEN), a link-tank for policy-relevant research toward post-carbon livelihoods and communities. She is co-director of Rising Voices: Climate Resilience through Indigenous and Earth Sciences, works with the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals to support tribes’ climate change adaptation planning, and is a lecturer in University of California-Santa Barbara’s Environmental Studies Program. Dr. Maldonado is also a founding member of the Culture and Disaster Action Network.

As a public anthropologist, Julie has consulted for the UN Development Programme and World Bank on resettlement, post-disaster needs assessments, and climate change. She worked for the US Global Change Research Program and is an author on the 3rd and 4th US National Climate Assessments. Her doctorate in anthropology from American University focused on the social and cultural impacts of environmental change and habitual disasters in coastal Louisiana. She was the lead editor for a special issue for the journal Climatic Change entitled, Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples in the United States: Impacts, Experiences and Actions, which was published in 2012. Her book, Seeking Justice in an Energy Sacrifice Zone: Standing on Vanishing Land in Coastal Louisiana, and co-edited volume, Challenging the Prevailing Paradigm of Displacement and Resettlement: Risks, Impoverishment, Legacies, Solutions, were both released in 2018. As part of LiKEN, she organized and is executive producer of the Paper Rocket Productions film, Protect, which will be released in December 2018. 

Dr. Julie K. Maldonado was awarded the President-Elect's 2016 Western Social Science Association's Outstanding New Scholar Award. The Immediate Past-President of the WSSA, the President, and the President-Elect annually honor a junior faculty member at a United States university who has been active in his or her discipline for less than five years after receiving their Ph.D. The awards recognize cutting edge research, substantial contributions to the social sciences, and the strong promise of future such contributions. 

Maldonado has also worked on various projects:

Specialization

Climate Change and Adaptation; Migration, Displacement, and Resettlement; Disaster Recovery and Risk Reduction

Education

Ph.D., Anthropology, American University

B.A., Psychology, Washington University in St. Louis

Research

Dr. Maldonado’s research focuses on climate change and adaptation; migration, displacement, and resettlement; and disaster recovery and risk reduction

Julie Maldonado on Human Rights and Climate Change (American Association for the Advancement of Science)

Stephanie Moret

Lecturer

smoret@es.ucsb.edu

 

Dr. Moret is a coalition builder with over 20 years of experience leading governments, planners, institutions, land owners, non-profits and project teams towards increased sustainability. Stephanie specializes in bringing stakeholders together to define issues and create tools and alternative strategies that lead to resilient systems for communities seeking sustainable solutions. While a full-time professor, she worked and taught in risk assessment and decision-making in complex systems, environmental modeling, landscape ecology, land use impacts on water resources, and in integrating strategic solutions for natural resource systems.

Stephanie has been the lead in developing local government habitat preservation responses to the Endangered Species Act, facilitating key issue teams, in procuring and administering project funding, in developing education and outreach programs, and in coordinating large-scale community involvement for multimillion dollar projects.  Dr. Moret has assisted cities, tribes, utilities, non-profits, and private clients with sustainable development, watershed restoration, habitat recovery, water supply protection, open space planning, natural resources management and integration of environmental principles into development. Working across disciplines, cultures, and interest groups has provided Stephanie with an appreciation for collaboration, coordination, and systems optimization. 

Specialization

Land Use Impacts on Water Resources, Ecological Connectivity and Sustainable Systems

Education

Ph.D., Environmental Sciences - Water Resources Track, Civil Engineering, Oregon State University

M.S., Geology - Water Resources, Oregon State University

B.S., Geology, University of California, Davis

Lori Pye

Lecturer

 

Dr. Pye is a Founder and President of Viridis Graduate Institute:International School of Ecopsychology. Dr. Pye’s background consists of environmental & marine conservation, undergraduate and graduate academic instruction. As an environmentalist, Dr. Pye worked with international NGOs to co-develop the Eastern Tropical Pacific Biological Seascape Corridor with the Ministers of the Environment from Costa Rica, Colombia, Panama, and Ecuador.  She has led international conferences on diverse issues: Nature and Human Nature, The Mythology of Violence, The Aesthetic Nature of Change, and These Women: Honoring Women in Archetypal and Depth Psychology. She has directed international NGO’s (Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, Ocean Futures educational program) and founded several of her own organizations. One of the main goals she had in founding Terra Azul in Costa Rica was to collaborate in the effort to stop shark finning. Working with hundreds of NGO’s, they co-develop the Eastern Tropical Pacific Biological Seascape Corridor with the Ministers of the Environment from Costa Rica, Colombia, Panama, and Ecuador. It took several years, but shark fining was eventually banned. 

This is what Dr. Pye had to say about teaching Environmental Studies at UCSB:

"[It] is like being at home. It allows me to not only share with like-minded individuals, but utilize experiences from my background in the sciences, mythology, and environmental conservation. I received my B.S. at Texas A&M and my M.S. and Ph.D. in Mythological Studies and Depth Psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute. It was a natural mix of passions and academics for me to bridge the sciences and humanities with my vocation in marine conservation."

Specialization

Environmental Conservation, Environmental Ethics, and Ecopsychology

Education

Ph.D., Pacifica Graduate Institute

Research

Her research interests revolves around how humans can become more conscious. 

Wagner Quiros

Lecturer

wagnerqp@ucsb.edu

 

Over the past 15 years Wagner has been researching and conserving sea turtles in both Costa Rica’s Caribbean and Pacific coasts, while also supporting other projects related to responsible fisheries, community base conservation and marine resource management in Latin America. He also has a strong passion for field science and outdoor education.

Specialization

Governance, Marine Conservation, Sea Turtle Research, Sustainable Fisheries, Community Base Conservation

Education

M.E.S.M., Bren School of Environmental Science & Management, UC Santa Barbara

B.S., Marine Biology, National University of Costa Rica

Katja Seltmann

Lecturer

seltmann@ccber.ucsb.edu

 

As Director of the Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration, Dr. Seltmann directs their three main research and programmatic areas — collections management, education, and restoration. The integration of these activities support the overall campus mission and provide unique opportunities for faculty, staff, students, and community members to explore, learn, and be inspired by our collections and campus natural areas. CCBER promotes the teaching of diverse undergraduate courses in EEMB, Environmental Studies, and Geology. It also supports faculty, staff, and student research interests by providing field and lab-based resources. In addition, CCBER houses regionally focused collections of terrestrial plants, algae, and vertebrates, as well as an extensive plant anatomy collection. 

Specialization

Biocollections, Entomology and Hyemenopterology

Education

PhD., Pennsylvania State University

MSc., University of Kentucky

BFA., University of Georgia 

Research

Dr. Seltmann's research agenda is in the field of biodiversity informatics, or data science research of digitized natural history collection records, arthropod diversity in restoration habitats, and expanding the STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) educational impact of restoration natural areas and natural history collections.

Daniela Soleri

Lecturer

soleri@geog.ucsb.edu

 

Specialization

Food Crop Diversity, Knowledge Systems in Agriculture, "Citizen" and Community Science/Participatory Research, and Food Gardens

Education

Ph.D., University of Arizona, Arid Land Resources-Ethnoecology, minor Plant Sciences

Research

Positively responding to the global challenges we face – the anthropogenic climate crisis, environmental degradation, and rising social inequity requires making use of diverse forms of knowledge and expertise. In agriculture, local knowledge often reflects people’s goals and the realities of the environments they are working in. Dr. Daniela Soleri's research investigates local knowledge, practices and outcomes in human management and use of crop plant diversity, including the consequences for adaptation to climate, environmental and social changes. Frequently this involves quantifying farmers’ and gardeners’ practices, and documenting the theory and values underlying those practices in un- or under-represented communities. Understanding this knowledge, expertise, and these practices, is the basis for partnerships between communities and scientists that are effective and based on respect and equity. Any improvements to these agricultural systems must build on a substantive understanding of how and why local systems work as well as they do, and be constructed through horizontal, equitable partnerships between scientists and practitioners.

Soleri has had the good fortune to work with biologists, plant breeders and crop geneticists, and with farmers in a number of locations: Hopi and Zuni Native American farmers in the US southwest, investigating changes in crop diversity over time, and cultural values related to intellectual property rights in traditional crops; in Oaxaca, Mexico quantifying the phenotypic and genetic consequences of farmer seed selection in maize and beans, farmers’ genetic perceptions regarding their maize, and their assessments of risk related to transgenic maize; in Cuba and Guatemala also documenting farmers’ assessments of risk related to transgenic maize; in Oaxaca, Mexico and southern California traditional foods of Oaxacan origin and their relationship with crop diversity and cultural identity; the stories and genetic characterizations of historic olive plantings in the greater Santa Barbara area. Daniela Soleri has co-authored, with David A. Cleveland, and illustrated the 1991 book Food from Dryland Gardens, on food gardening in arid areas. Food Gardens for a Changing World is a new book published by CABI in 2019, co-authored with David A. Cleveland and Steven E. Smith, about food gardens in changing climates, environments and societies. Most recently she is conducting research on seed libraries and other small scale, community seed management in California to explore how public scientists might partner with and support grassroots seed sharing through participatory or community science. Soleri is a member of the Citizen Science Association (CSA) and was a co-founder and co-chair of the CSA’s Integrity, Diversity and Equity Working Group.

David Stone

Senior Continuing Lecturer

david.stone@ucsb.edu

 

Specialization

Urban and Environmental Planning, Environmental Impact Statements, NEPA, and CEQA

Education

M.A., University of California, Santa Barbara

Lisa Stratton

Lecturer

stratton@ccber.ucsb.edu

 

Lisa Stratton has been the Director of Ecosystem Management for UCSB's Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration (CCBER) since 2005. As the manager of the campus lagoon and other open space areas on campus, she has been active in pursuing opportunities to improve water quality and provide habitat through bioswales and treatment wetlands. She received her PhD at University of Hawaii-Manoa, her Masters from University of Wisconsin-Madison and my undergraduate degree at Stanford. She has been a change agent on the landscape committee since the inception of UCSB's sustainability commitment and worked towards promoting sustainable, non-invasive, low water landscapes that celebrate UCSB's unique location within a matrix of natural habitats and wetlands.

Specialization

Ecological Restoration, Plant Physiology, Water Quality and Ecosystem Management

Education

Ph.D., Botany, Univ. Hawaii - Manoa

Kelly Thomasson

Teaching Associate

kelly.thomasson@lifesci.ucsb.edu

 

Specialization

Sympatric Speciation, Experimental Evolution, Genetics of Adaptation, Yeast Sporulation

Research

Kelly is interested in the factors (both genetic and environmental) that drive biodiversity. Why are some monophyletic groups so speciose while other groups are not? Is the majority of the biological diversity we see the result of allopatry, sympatry, or parapatry?

She is currently working on projects directly related to the idea of sympatry, focusing on the necessary ecological elements in a sympatric speciation event and how behavioral trade-offs can allow for possible divergence events. Her dissertation will cover theoretical elements of evolution as well as comparative analysis of selection by different mechanisms and long term evolution experiments.

Claudia Tyler

Lecturer

tyler@ucsb.edu

 

Professor Claudia Tyler joined the CCS biology faculty in 2004, and has taught or co-taught a range of classes in the college, including Introductory Biology, Field Studies in Ecology, Natural History of Central California Coast Ranges (“Walking Biology”), Conservation Ecology, Ethical Issues in Science, and Physiology of Stress.  She earned her PhD. in 1994 at UCSB where her dissertation research focused on post-fire regeneration in chaparral plant communities. She currently conducts research at UC Sedgwick Reserve on community dynamics in oak woodlands.

In April 2014, Claudia Tyler recieved the Distinguished Teaching Award. The criteria for the award consists of many different things, among them are documented examples of the following: innovative teaching efforts, placement record of graduate students—how many placed at which institutions throughout the nominee’s academic career, and integration of research and teaching. Professor Tyler has consistently exhibited excellence in all.

Specialization

Plant Ecology, Ecological Disturbance, and Grassland and Shrublands

Education

Ph.D., University of California Santa Barbara

B.A., Wellesley College

Research

Dr. Tyler's research is in the field of plant ecology. She is interested in the role of disturbance, plant-animal interactions and other factors in structuring populations and communities, primarily in shrubland, grassland and oak woodland systems. Her current research areas include controls on establishment of oaks (Quercus lobata, Q. douglasii, and Q. agrifolia), effects of cattle on oak savanna plant communities, and mechanisms affecting post-fire chaparral seedling establishment.

Deborah Williams

Lecturer

deborah1518@gmail.com

 

Deborah Williams is currently an environmental consultant, and has dedicated over 35 years of service to advancing environmental protection in Alaska, California, and the nation. Deborah graduated from Harvard Law School, with honors, where she founded and served as co-editor-in-chief of the Harvard Environmental Law Review. After serving in the Solicitors Honors Program of the Department of Interior in Washington, DC, Deborah relocated to Alaska and was the attorney for the National Park Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Between 1981 and 1994, she practiced law and was also the Executive Director of the Alaska Consumer Advocacy Program and of the Alaska Lung Association.

In 1994, Deborah received an appointment from President Clinton to serve as the Special Assistant to the Secretary of Interior for Alaska, in which position she advised the Secretary about managing over 220 million acres of national lands. Deborah later served as the Executive Director of the Alaska Conservation Foundation for over six years, winning many awards in that role, and then served as the President of Alaska Conservation Solutions, focusing on climate change.

Specialization

Public Lands

Staff

Currently Vacant

Financial Administrator

es-financial@es.ucsb.edu

 

  • Payroll & Kronos Administration:
    • Readers, Student Assistants, and Limited Employees)
  • Financial Administration:
    • All Scholarship Award
    • Recruitment Expenses
    • All Start-Up Funding
    • Schuyler Lecturer Fund
    • Manley Lecture Fund
    • Green Initiative Fund
  • Gateway Department Buyer
  • Flexcard Purchaser
  • UC Path Initiator
  • Financial Reporting

Erinn Magann

Academic Personnel Coordinator

es-ap@es.ucsb.edu

 

  • UC Recruit Coordinator - Temp. Lecturers
  • TA/Associate-In appointment coordinator
  • Lecturer (non-senate) appointments
  • Scholarship and Awards 
  • UC Path Initiator
  • AP Reporting 
  • Marketing (flyers, website)
  • Event Planning

Vivian Stopple

Financial Analyst

es-financial@es.ucsb.edu

 

  • Payroll & Kronos Administration:
    • Staff, Faculty, TAs, Continuing/Temporary Lecturers
  • Financial Administration:
    • General Funds
    • Research Accounts
    • Endowment Funds
    • Various Donor Funds
    • Temporary Sub-0 Funds
    • URCA/FRAP/TSRA Funds
  • Gateway Purchasing Administrator/Approver
  • Flexcard Allocator
  • UC Path Approver/Initiator
  • GL Reconciliation & Budgeting Administrator
  • Visa Coordinator 

Nea Alvarado Voss

Business Officer

alvaradovoss@ucsb.edu

 

Area's of Responsibility:

  • Program Management and Budget
  • Systems Access Processor
  • IT/Building Operations & Support
  • Faculty Committees Coordinator
  • Merits & Promotions Case Manager
  • UC Recruit Administrator
  • Curriculum Plan Coordinator
  • FTE Plan Coordinator
  • UC Path Approver
  • Building & Space Administrator

Specialization

Program Management and Budget

Brandon Fuerte

Student Office Assistant

brandonfuerte@ucsb.edu

 

Responsibilities:

  • General Clerical Duties
  • DSP Requests
  • Textbook Organization
  • ESCI Administration
  • Mail Distribution
  • ES Social Media

Lisa Xu

Student Office Assistant

lishanxu@ucsb.edu

 

Responsibilities:

  • General Clerical Duties
  • DSP Requests
  • Textbook Organization
  • ESCI Administration
  • Mail Distribution
  • ES Social Media

Eric Zimmerman

Student Affairs Manager and Internship Director

zimmerman@es.ucsb.edu

 

  • Internship Program Coordinator
  • Course Scheduling
  • Alumni and Community Relations
  • Curriculum Plan Coordinator
  • Liaison with Development, Registrar, College of Letters & Science
  • Curriculum Committee Advisor

Research Staff & Postdoctorates

Jason J Benedict

Assistant Research Specialist

jbenedict@es.ucsb.edu

 

Jason Benedict is an Assistant Research Specialist who joined CEL in January 2018. Jason received his B.S degree in Remote Sensing from University of Technology Malaysia in 2004. He is interested in using data science and geospatial technologies to map supply chains and better understand the environmental and social impacts of no deforestation, no peat, no exploitation (NDPE) policies and eco-certification in oil palm supply chains. Prior to joining the lab, Jason was the Data Analytics and Visualization Lead at The Forest Trust in Malaysia. In his spare time, Jason enjoys going for a good run, catching a movie, reading and following his favorite football team, Liverpool FC.

Ian Carrillo

NSF Postdoctoral Research Fellow

icarrillo@es.ucsb.edu

 

Dr. Carrillo is a NSF Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Departments of Environmental Studies and Sociology at the University of California Santa Barbara. In Brazil, he works in affiliation with the Social Science Center for Development, Agriculture, and Society at the Federal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro. In 2018, he completed his PhD in Sociology and Community & Environmental Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In 2021, he will join the University of Oklahoma as an assistant professor of sociology. His research and teaching interests include race and ethnicity, environmental sociology, and economic sociology. Ian uses qualitative, ethnographic, and comparative-historical methods to examine how race and racism shape the formation of environmental practices and policies in multi-racial societies, such as Brazil and the U.S. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the Fulbright Program, and Foreign Language and Area Studies fellowships.

AFM Kamal Chowdhury

Postdoctoral Researcher

kchowdhury@es.ucsb.edu

 

Dr. Kamal has been working as a postdoctoral researcher in the Clean Energy Transformation Lab of Environmental Studies Program at the University of California Santa Barbara from July 2020. He completed PhD in Civil Engineering from the University of Newcastle, Australia in 2017, followed by a summer research fellowship in the Australian National University. In 2018 2020, Kamal worked as a postdoctoral research fellow in the Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore. Before that, he conducted several teaching and consultancy assignments in Bangladesh and Australia.

Veronica Jacome

UC President's Postdoctoral Fellow

verojacome@ucsb.edu

 

Dr. Jacome is a University of California President’s postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Environmental Studies at UC Santa Barbara. She completed her Ph.D. in the Energy and Resources Group at UC Berkeley with professor Isha Ray. Dr. Jacome’s research interrogates the links between energy infrastructure, development, and environmental justice. Situating her work in electricity access in the Global South, she investigates how contemporary assumptions about the value of electricity development impact inequalities. Specifically, she is interested in the relational processes that (re)produce socio-material conditions within electricity services characterized by expensive and erratic access. At UC Santa Barbara, Dr. Jacome will conduct a historical-comparative study of infrastructure build-out in the US, Britain, Ghana, and Tanzania, and explore the relationship between nation-state building, colonial and post-colonial interrelations, and capitalist investment of so-called successful and unsuccessful electricity infrastructures. Guided by a rigorous understanding of electric power systems and critical social theory, her research contributes to the political economy of development and the environment, critical urban studies, and theories of the Global South.

Alex McInturff

Postdoctoral Researcher

amcinturff@ucsb.edu

 

Dr. McInturff is a post-doctoral researcher in the departments of ES and ISBER at the University of California Santa Barbara and is the core researcher for the North American program of CONVIVA. In 2019, he completed his Ph.D. in Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at UC Berkeley with professor Justin Brashares. His research and teaching interests include human-wildlife interactions and conflicts, wildlife ecology and conservation biology, human dimensions of wildlife research, environmental justice, geospatial analysis, and ecopoetry. Dr. McInturff combines qualitative and quantitative methods to examine reciprocal links between social tolerance for wildlife, ecological patterns, and conservation action at multiple scales. His research at UCSB focuses on the proposed reintroduction of grizzly bears to California. This case study not only offers an important opportunity to conduct research that shapes policy, but it also offers broad theoretical, conceptual, and methodological insights regarding the complex socio-ecological challenges of large carnivore conservation and their implications for just and sustainable futures for people and wildlife.

Dena Montague

Research Associate

denamontague@ucsb.edu

 

Dena Montague earned a PhD in Political Science from UCLA and a BA from Brown University. She is the co-founder of ÉnergieRich, an international social enterprise establishing durable renewable energy access and food sustainability through local production of innovative technology. Prior to her doctoral studies she was a Research Associate at the World Policy Institute where she analyzed questions concerning the impact of extractive sector management on democracy, development and human rights in Africa. Dr. Montague has conducted research in several African countries including Nigeria, Niger, The Democratic Republic of Congo, Burkina Faso, as well as extensive research in Paris on race, social movements and economic inequality. Her published articles can be found in magazines and journals including, The SAIS Review of International Affairs and Brown Journal of World Affairs. She served as a Postdoctoral Scholar at Duke University, and at UCSB with the Center for Black Studies Research.

Emeriti & Retired Faculty

Daniel Botkin

Emeritus Professor

 

Daniel Botkin is a scientist who studies life from a planetary perspective, a biologist who has helped solve major environmental issues, and a writer about nature. A frequent public speaker, Botkin brings an unusual perspective to his subject. Well-known for his scientific contributions in ecology and environment, he has also worked as a professional journalist and has degrees in physics, biology, and literature. His books and lectures show how our cultural legacy often dominates what we believe to be scientific solutions. He discusses the roles of scientists, businessmen, stakeholders, and government agencies in new approaches to environmental issues. He uses historical accounts by Lewis and Clark and Henry David Thoreau to discuss the character of nature and the relationship between people and nature.

Specialization

Environmental biology and global ecology

David Brokensha

Emeritus Professor

 

Professor Brokensha's scholarly interests focused mainly on social and ecological changes in rural areas, especially in tropical Africa, as well as development anthropology. In his lifetime, Professor Brokensha achieved considerable recognition in these areas of research. In addition to his central research focus, Professor Brokensha also studied a variety of classic anthropological topics, such as settlement patterns and resettlement practices in the context of economic development; kinship and marriage practices; history of ethnology; subsistence practices; deforestation and environmental change; and gender and labor. He also wrote and advised widely on topics pertaining to the training of social and development workers, critically evaluating the inception and practice of development research in Africa.

Dr. David Brokensha passed on July 15, 2017.
Chancellor's message on David Brokensha

Specialization

Cultural ecology and Modernization

Oliver Chadwick

Emeritus Professor

oac@geog.ucsb.edu

 

Dr. Chadwick is a joint professor in the Geography Department and Environmental Studies Program at UCSB. His work is in the areas of soil sciences, soil genesis and classification, advanced pedology, and soil geomorphology.

Dr. Chadwick has established himself as a leader in soil science, and is one of the world leaders in relating soils to ecology and earth system science. He has become of the core members of a small but growing and extremely high quality group in ecosystem studies at UCSB. His recently published paper in Nature, and international journal of science, focuses on his ten year research that utilizes Hawaii as a model ecosystem to understand changes in the sources of nutrients to rainforests.

Specialization

Soil Sciences, Soil Genesis and Classification, and Advanced Pedology and Geomorphology

Research

Dr. Chadwick's research interests include pedology, soil geomorphology, soil geochemistry, quaternary geology, organic and mineral fluxes during soil, atmosphere, water and vegetation interaction. He has clearly established himself as a leader in soil science, and is one of the world leaders in relating soils to ecology and earth system science. Professor Chadwick has become one of the core members of a small, but growing and extremely high quality group in ecosystem studies at UCSB.

David Cleveland

Emeritus Professor

cleveland@es.ucsb.edu

 

David Cleveland is a human ecologist who has done research and development project work on sustainable agrifood systems with small-scale farmers and gardeners around the world, including in Bawku (Ghana), Oaxaca (Mexico), Zuni and Hopi (southwest USA), North-West Frontier Province (Pakistan) and Santa Barbara County (California, USA). He earned an M.S. in genetics and a Ph.D. (1980) in ecological anthropology from the University of Arizona, and is a professor in the Environmental Studies Program, University of California, Santa Barbara. At UCSB he is also an affiliated faculty member in the Department of Geography and the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology. Cleveland’s research and teaching focus on sustainable, small-scale agrifood systems, including plant breeding and conservation of crop genetic diversity, local and scientific knowledge and collaboration between farmers and scientists, climate change, nutrition and food sovereignty. He is currently researching the potential for agrifood system localization to improve nutrition, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and strengthen communities in Santa Barbara County, California and the US; and on the genetic, ecological and sociocultural impact of genetically engineered crop varieties globally. His latest book is Balancing on a Planet: The Future of Food and Agriculture (2014, University of California Press).

Specialization

Sustainable, Small-scale Agrifood Systems, Plant Breeding, Local and Scientific Knowledge, Climate Change, Nutrition, and Food Sovereignty

Education

Ph.D., University of Arizona

Research

Dr. David Cleveland’s research focuses on small-scale, sustainable agriculture and its role in responding to climate change, resource scarcities, new technologies, and demands for social justice. His current foci include the potential impacts of agrifood system localization on climate change, nutrition and community, and the genetic, ecological and sociocultural impact of genetically engineered crop varieties.

William Freudenburg

Dehlsen Professor

 

Dr. Freudenburg, the 2004-05 President of the Rural Sociological Society, has devoted most of his career to the study of environment-society relationships. He is particularly well-known both for his work on coupled environment-society systems in general and for his work on more specific topics, including resource-dependent communities, the social impacts of environmental and technological change, and risk analysis. He has held official positions with the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Sociological Association, and the National Academy of Sciences, among others. He is the winner of Awards from the American Sociological Association, Rural Sociological Society, Pacific Sociological Association, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, as well as being listed in numerous reference works, including Who's Who in Science and Engineering, Who's Who in America, and Who's Who in the World. Recent and forthcoming publications have focused on topics ranging from the social impacts of U.S. oil dependence to the polarized nature of debates over spotted owls, with a special emphasis on “disproportionality,” or the tendency for a major fraction of all environmental impacts to be associated with a surprisingly small fraction of the overall economy.

Dr. William Freudenburg passed on December 28, 2010.
Chancellor's message on William Freudenburg

Specialization

Environmental Sociology

Garrett Hardin

Emeritus Professor

 

Trained as an ecologist and microbiologist, Hardin is best known for his pioneering 1968 essay, "The Tragedy of the Commons," which is widely accepted today as a fundamental contribution to ecology, population theory, economics, and political science.

Garrett Hardin, died at his home in Santa Barbara on September 14, 2003.

Specialization

Human Ecology

Charles Kolstad

Emeritus Professor

kolstad@bren.ucsb.edu

 

Charles Kolstad is an internationally known economist who once served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Ghana and has taught at universities in the U.S, Russia, and Belgium. His research interests are in information, uncertainty and regulation; he does much of his applied work in the area of climate change and energy markets.  Currently he is a Convening Lead Author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (co-recipient of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize), an advisor to the California Air Resources Board and Editor of the journal Review of Environmental Economics & Policy.  He is a former president of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists (AERE)  and has authored more than 100 publications, including the undergraduate text, Environmental Economics, which has been translated into Japanese, Spanish and Chinese; the second edition was published in Spring 2010.  At UC Santa Barbara, Prof. Kolstad is a Professor in the School of Environmental Science & Management and in the Department of Economics, where he is Chairperson.  He is also Co-Director of the newly established University of California Center for Energy & Environmental Economics, a joint undertaking of UC Berkeley and UC Santa Barbara.  He is a University Fellow at Resources for the Future (Washington), a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (Cambridge) and a Fellow of CESifo (Munich).  In 2009 he was elected Fellow of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.

Specialization

Environmental Economics, Environmental Regulation, Climate

Mel Manalis

Professor Emeritus

manalis@es.ucsb.edu

 

Specialization

Wind and Solar Energy Conversion and Assessment, Global Warming, Nuclear Energy, Planning and Economic Evaluation of Renewable Energy

Research

Dr. Mel Manalis is a Research Physicist and Senior Lecturer for the Environmental Studies Program and a member of the Institute for Energy Efficiency’s Economics and Policy Solutions Group. His research interests surround the development of quantifiable sustainability measures. Dr. Manalis has taught at UCSB for 35 years and has developed courses related to energy. During the 1980’s, he led a seminal delegation of wind energy experts to advise the Chinese government on how to initialize a large-scale wind energy effort that has become a major underpinning of today’s rapid advance in China’s wind power development. He conducted the first wind energy study of Vandenberg Air Force Base in Lompoc, California and the nascent study of solar energy applications for the California Energy Commission following the 1973 oil embargo.

Marc McGinnes

Emeritus

mcginnes@es.ucsb.edu

 

Marc McGinnes retired from his regular teaching duties in 2005, capping a distinguished 33-year teaching career at UCSB during which he won numerous teaching awards, including the Alumni Association Outstanding Teaching Award. As an emeritus member of faculty, he has continued to advise and mentor students, to conduct research, and to accept invitations to speak on campus and in the community. In 2017 he developed and taught a now-popular seminar on the topic of Hope That Works.

McGinnes is a graduate of Stanford University (B.A. History, 1963), where he was an honors student in history and an intercollegiate athlete in four sports, and of the University of California at Berkeley School of Law (Boalt Hall, 1966). Following post-doctoral study in France as a Rotary International Foundation Fellow, he joined the San Francisco law firm of Thelen, Marrin, Johnson & Bridges as an attorney working for Bechtel and other clients in the engineering and construction industries. In 1969 he moved to Santa Barbara in order to begin work as an environmental lawyer in the aftermath of the offshore oil platform blowout and spill early that year.

He served as chair of the January 28 Committee which presented the Santa Barbara Declaration of Environmental Rights at the national Environmental Rights Day conference on the first anniversary of the blowout and spill. He then became the founding president of the Community Environmental Council (1970), one of the nation’s first community-based environmental education centers, and in 1971 he accepted the invitation to join the faculty of the newly-established Environmental Studies Program, where he developed and taught ten courses in the areas of environmental law, policy, dispute resolution, and ecopsychology, including the longest running undergraduate course in environmental law in the United States. McGinnes also developed and taught courses for the Law and Society Program. He is the author of Principles of Environmental Law (Rainbow Bridge 1980).

In addition to his academic teaching and scholarship, McGinnes has been a pioneer in the professional practices of environmental law (the application of legal principles to address environmental problems) and legal ecology (the application of ecological principles to address legal problems such as inappropriate adversarialism).

McGinnes began practicing environmental law in Santa Barbara in 1969, and in 1977 he led the founding of the Environmental Defense Center (EDC), a regionally-centered public interest environmental law firm. EDC led a successful 6-year struggle on behalf of Native American groups to prevent the construction of a liquified natural gas (LNG) facility near Pt. Conception on land held by them to be sacred. EDC lawyers have represented dozens of environmental organizations and others in scores of cases involving a wide variety of planning and environmental protection issues.

In 1986 McGinnes led the founding of two groups—Peaceful Resolutions Institute and Community Mediation Council-- that facilitated the development and delivery of mediation and other alternative dispute resolution services in the community. His presentations on Using and Practicing Law as a Healing Art have been featured at numerous conferences on peacemaking and conflict resolution.

From 1970 to the present McGinnes has served as a director and advisor to numerous non-profit organizations including the Congress on Optimum Population and Environment (Chicago), Earth Island Institute (San Francisco), Antioch University (Santa Barbara) and Viridis Graduate Institute (Santa Barbara).

McGinnes is also an accomplished performer on stilts who has been an uplifting presence on campus and around town with considerable regularity since 1975. His second book, Rise Up! A Stilter’s Adventures in Higher Consciousness (Mercury Press 2017) was recently published, and he is currently at work on his third, Falling in Love with the Earth, Again which will be released in Fall 2018.

Specialization

Environmental Law, Policy, and Dispute Resolution

Roderick Nash

Emeritus Professor

canyondancer@yahoo.com

 

Roderick Nash is considered America's foremost wilderness historian. He is regarded as a national leader in the field of environmental history and management and environmental education. Among his numerous books and over 150 essays, Professor Roderick Frazier Nash is best known for Wilderness and the American Mind, which has received many reprintings, revised editions, and foreign translations. Nash, a past Lindbergh Fellow, has served on the board of directors of the Yosemite Institute and as a member of the advisory committee to the U.S. National Park Service.

Specialization

Environmental History

Barry Schuyler

Emeritus Lecturer

 

Retired after twenty years at UCSB, Arent H. “Barry” Schuyler, Jr., was one of the faculty who helped found the environmental studies program in 1970 and was chairman of the program for four years. Before coming to UCSB he taught high school science and math.

Dr. Schuyler received a B.A. in chemistry from Caltech, an M.S. in biology from UCSB, and a Ph.D. in environmental studies and engineering from UCLA. His research interests are the hazards and risks of oil and marine operations in the Santa Barbara Channel. He was an advisor to State Senator Gary Hart on these matters.

Dr. Schuyler has been president of the trustees of the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History and is currently chairman of the board of the Santa Barbara Maritime Museum. He and his wife, Jean, live in Santa Barbara and are members of the Chancellor’s Council and the Lancaster Society. They endowed a chair in environmental studies at UCSB.

Sailing is an important part of Dr. Schuyler’s life and he has made over a hundred trips to the Santa Barbara Channel Islands, especially to San Miguel Island. He became a trustee of The UCSB Foundation in 2000.

Dr. Barry Schuyler passed on April 28, 2011.

Susan Stonich

Professor Emeritus

stonich@anth.ucsb.edu

 

Susan Stonich has several interrelated research and teaching interests: the conflicts and contradictions between economic development and environmental conservation efforts in coastal zones in the context of climate change; environmental justice; vulnerability and resilience to climate related hazards and disasters; international tourism; and aquaculture (particularly shrimp and shellfish farming).  She works primarily in Central America and the Caribbean but has also worked in South-East Asia. She uses a political ecology approach in her research that integrates the perspectives of political economy and human ecology and determines the linkages between spatial, geopolitical, ecosystem, and temporal scales.  Her research focuses particularly on several types of “securities;” social network security, household livelihood security, health/food security, and environmental security.  She has served on many national and international panels and committees including the National Academies of Science/National Research Council Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change (1997-2003) and the Scientific Advisory Committee, Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of Canada (2003 – 2006). She now serves as a member of the United States Climate Change Science Program, Human Impacts of Climate Change Advisory Committee. 

Specialization

Ecological Anthropology, Economic Globalization, Human-Environment Systems, Shrimp Farming, Tourism and Conservation

Paul Wack

Senior Continuing Lecturer

pwack@calpoly.edu

 

Paul Wack holds a Master of Public Administration degree from the University of Southern California (1976) and a Master of Arts degree in Urban Geography from California State University, Northridge (1974). He has had a very distinguished career as an environmental planning professional in both the private and public sectors during the past twenty-three years. He has served in a variety of planning advisory roles for cities and counties throughout California, including the County of Ventura, the County of Santa Barbara, and the City of Santa Barbara. He is the former chair of the Santa Barbara County Planning Commission.

Specialization

Planning, Agricultural Land Preservation, Environmental Assessment, and Sustainable Communities

Bob Wilkinson

Senior Lecturer Emeritus

wilkinson@bren.ucsb.edu

 

Dr. Robert C. Wilkinson is Adjunct Professor at the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, and Senior Lecturer Emeritus in the Environmental Studies Program, at the University of California, Santa Barbara. The focus of Dr. Wilkinson’s teaching, research, and consulting is on water, energy, and climate policy. Dr. Wilkinson is also a Senior Fellow with the California Council for Science and Technology. He co-chairs the U.S. Sustainable Water Resources Roundtable and has served as an advisor to the State of Victoria, Australia, the Water and Energy Team for the California Climate Action Team, the California State Water Plan, and agencies including the California Energy Commission, the California State Water Resources Control Board, the California Department of Water Resources, and others on water, energy, and climate issues. He has also advised various federal agencies including the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on water, energy, and climate research and policy, and he served as coordinator for the climate impacts assessment of the California Region for the US Global Change Research Program and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

Specialization

Environmental Policy, Water and Watershed Policy, Energy, Climate Change, and Urban Environment

Affiliated Faculty

Mona Damluji

Assistant Professor

damluji@ucsb.edu

 

Mona Damluji is Assistant Professor of Film & Media Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara and a Peabody and Emmy Award-nominated producer of the short documentary series The Secret Life of Muslims. Her teaching, research and creative work engages underrepresented media histories and cultural studies of oil, urban space and infrastructure with a focus on the Middle East and its diasporas.

Mona’s current book project Pipeline Cinema is a history of how multinational petroleum companies shaped local cultural norms and global popular imaginaries of oil and the Middle East through film and media sponsorship in the twentieth century.

Mona is a co-curator of the traveling exhibition Arab Comics: 90 Years of Popular Visual Culture and Multitudes: An Art Exhibit after #muslimban. Her publications appear in Urban HistoryComparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle EastInternational Journal of Islamic ArchitectureSubterranean Estates: the Life Worlds of Oil and GasArs OrientalisMEI Insights and Jadaliyya.

Mona is a co-convener of the IHC Research Focus Group on Re-centering Energy Justice for AY 2019/2020. She was a co-PI of the UCSB Mellon Sawyer Seminar on Energy Justice in Global Perspective for AY 2018/2019.

Specialization

Energy Humanities, Film, Middle East Studies, Media History

Darby Feldwinn

Lecturer with Security of Employment

feldwinn@chem.ucsb.edu

 

Darby Feldwinn received her PhD from UCSD, where she worked in Dr. Andrew Kummel's laboratory researching oxides/IIIV semiconductor interfaces. During her graduate career she first took an interest in teaching and won the teaching assistant excellence award. After graduating she stayed on at UCSD for an additional year as a postdoc where she continued her research and taught general chemistry. Darby joined the UCSB faculty in 2009.

Specialization

Math and Science Education, and Green Technology

Education

University of California, San Diego

Research

Feldwinn is part of the Chemistry Department's Fifth Grade Chemistry Outreach Program. It is a partnership between local elementary students and teachers and UCSB students and faculty. To improve educational opportunities for K-12 students, the program brings fifth grade students to the chemistry lab at UCSB every Thursday morning to participate in hands-on standards-based physical science activities. The program is designed to nourish their natural curiosity in science and to stimulate an interest in pursuing a higher education in science.  In addition, UCSB students are given the opportunity to share their love of science with elementary students and to consider a career path as a science educator.

John Foran

Professor

foran@soc.ucsb.edu

 

John Foran is professor of sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he is also involved with the programs in Latin American and Iberian Studies, Global and International Studies, Environmental Studies, and the Bren School. He was visiting professor of sociology and Latin American Studies at Smith College from 2000 to 2002, and Visiting Professor of Sociology at Goldsmith's College, University of London, from 2009 to 2010. As he states in his syllabi, “I consider teaching a revolutionary act… Learning and teaching are complex, endlessly fascinating collaborations. I learn enormous amounts from the students in my classes, whom I consider colleagues and companions on an intellectual, potentially life-changing journey.”

Specialization

Climate Crisis, Global Climate Justice Movement, and Sustainable Development, and “Building Better Futures” 

Education

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley

Research

Professor Foran’s current areas of interest include the comparative study of 20th-century revolutions and 21st-century radical social change, development, climate, and globalization, and the global justice and climate justice movements.

As a comparative-historical sociologist, Professor Foran has written on many aspects of revolutions and movements for radical or deep social change. He is currently working on a book, Taking Power or (Re)Making Power:  Movements for Radical Social Change and Global Justice. He is also engaged in a long-term research project on the global climate justice movement, with Richard Widick. Their work can be followed at www.iicat.org

Ken Hiltner

Professor

hiltner@english.ucsb.edu

 

Since arriving at UCSB in 2006, he has served as Director of both the Early Modern Center and the Literature and the Environment Initiative. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University, where he garnered a number of distinctions as a researcher and Teaching Fellow, including the Bowdoin Prize. Prior to becoming a professor, he made his living as a furniture maker. Hiltner is Director of the Environmental Humanities Center (EHC).

Specialization

Literature, the Medieval Period, and Environmental Initiatives

Education

Ph.D., Harvard University

Research

Professor Ken Hiltner’s passion is for both old books and imagining how they might be reinvented digitally. As one of the managing officers for the Milton Society of America, he is spearheading an effort to make Milton’s great epic poem Paradise Lost into a highly collaborative, social edition optimized for tablet computers. This reliable and up-to-date digital book will be made available to students and other interested individuals worldwide absolutely free of charge. Hiltner has also written a number of books and articles exploring how our modern environmental crisis began making its appearance in Milton’s era. 

Jeffrey Hoelle

Associate Professor

hoelle@anth.ucsb.edu

 

Dr. Jeffrey Hoelle is a cultural anthropologist interested in human-environment interactions in the Brazilian Amazon. His research seeks to understand Amazonian livelihoods and land uses in relation to political and economic drivers, but also to expand the view through attention to cultural factors, such as ideals of work, nature, and masculinity, as well as food and landscape preferences. His goal in this research is to understand why destructive environmental practices, particularly cattle raising, make sense from the perspective of different actors. His book book, Rainforest Cowboys: The Rise of Ranching and Cattle Culture in Western Amazonia, won the 2016 Book Prize from the Brazil Section the Latin American Studies Association. 

Specialization

Sociocultural Anthropology, Environmental Anthropology, Ethnography, Land Change, Latin America, and the Brazilian Amazon

Education

Ph.D., University of Florida

M.A., Latin American Studies, University of Texas

Research

Dr. Hoelle is involved with several reserach projects, including:

  • Cross-cultural comparison of cattle economies, cattle cultures, and beef consumption
  • Integrating culture into land use-land change frameworks, theory, and modeling
  • The function and aesthetics of everyday forms of nature control and domination
  • The anthropology of environmental degradation in the Brazilian Amazon, focusing on cattle raising and gold mining
  • The IV Ethnobotany Project 

Hugo Loaiciga

Professor

hloaiciga@ucsb.edu

 

Dr. Loaiciga's research focuses on Hydrology, especially in the subjects of groundwater hydrology, hydrogeology, water resources systems, and applied mathematics. He applies numerical, statistical, and field methods to answer complex problems involving the interactions between surface water, groundwater, and human activities. 

Specialization

Planning, Design and Analysis of Water Resources Systems, and Theory and Computational Aspects of Surface and Ground Water Hydrology

Doug McCauley

Assistant Professor

douglas.mccauley@lifesci.ucsb.edu

 

Specialization

Behavior, Ecosystem Ecology, Marine Biology, Population and Community Ecology

Education

PhD, Biology/Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University

B.A., Integrative Biology, University of California at Berkeley

B.A., Political Science, University of California at Berkeley

Research

The McCauley Lab uses a diverse suite of methods to answer pressing questions in community and ecosystem ecology. Research in the lab is directed at understanding how community structure influences ecosystem dynamics, in determining how ecosystems are interactively and energetically coupled to one another, and quantifying how humans perturb these dynamics and shape patterns of biodiversity. The lab engages these questions using tools from the disciplines of community ecology, biogeochemistry, spatial analysis, ecological modeling, conservation biology, and anthropology. An important aim of research in the McCauley Lab is to generate results that both advance the pure science of ecology and that can be of practical service to decision makers responsible for shaping the future of our environment. We conduct research in a variety of ecological contexts (e.g. coral reefs, tropical savannas, Californian ecosystems) pursuing the philosophy that first principles in ecology can be most effectively derived via observation of pattern and process in diverse settings.

Matto Mildenberger

Assistant Professor

mildenberger@polsci.ucsb.edu

 

Matto Mildenberger is Assistant Professor of Political Science. His research explores the political drivers of policy inaction in the face of serious social and economic threats posed by global climate change. Straddling comparative political economy and political behavior, Mildenberger's work focusses on comparative climate policymaking and the dynamics of US climate opinion. His current book project compares the politics of carbon pricing across advanced economies, with a focus on the history of climate reforms in Australia, Norway and the United States. Other ongoing work explores public environmental behaviors, political ideology, and the relationship between economic and environmental policy preferences. A previous book, Dependent America? How Mexico and Canada Construct US Power (Toronto 2011, with Stephen Clarkson), explored the political economy of North American trade and security relationships.

Specialization

Comparative Politics, Environmental Politics, Public Opinion, Methodology
 

Education

Ph.D., Yale University, 2015

Research

Matto's research focuses on climate policy inaction in the face of dramatic economic and social costs associated with the climate crisis. A current book project explores variation in the timing and content of carbon pricing policies across advanced economies, with particular attention to the role of carbon polluters in shaping climate policy outcomes. He also studies the dynamics of public climate and energy opinions. At UCSB, he co-run the Environment and Energy Transitions (ENVENT) Lab.

Russell Schmitt

Professor

schmitt@lifesci.ucsb.edu

 

Specialization

Population and Community Ecology, Applied Ecology, Consumer-resource Interactions, Marine Invertebrates and Reef Fishes

Education

Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles

Research

The objective of Schmitt's research is to understand general processes and mechanisms that influence (1) abundance and dynamics of populations and (2) species composition and diversity of communities. He makes an extensive use of field experiments and observations to explore such fundamental issues as consumer - resource interactions (e.g., predator-prey, exploitation competition, apparent competition), population dynamics and regulation, and bio-diversity and coexistence of competitors. All of his work has been conducted in subtidal reef environments of temperate and tropical marine ecosystems using both benthic invertebrates and reef fishes as model systems. Because many marine organisms have dispersing life stages (and therefore can have local populations that are demographically open), reef systems provide the opportunity to explore issues related to scale dependency and to the causes and consequences of variation in the contributions of different processes to abundance, dynamics and regulation. In addition to his fundamental research, he is interested in the application of ecological principles to the resolution of coastal marine environmental problems. This perspective includes the development and application of techniques to estimate the effect size of ecological impacts and to ameliorate those impacts through scientifically rigorous restoration and conservation approaches.

Eric R.A.N. Smith

Professor

smith@polsci.ucsb.edu

 

Eric Smith's research focuses on environmental politics, public opinion, and elections.  In the area of environmental politics, he has explored public opinion toward offshore oil development, nuclear power, wind power, energy crises, and climate change.  He has also investigated the reasons why the general public often does not trust scientists or scientific findings.  Along with Juliet Carlisle, Jessica Feezell, and Kristy Michaud, he recently published The Politics of Energy Crises (Oxford University Press, 2017).  In the area of public opinion, Smith has investigated problems such as how tolerance for LGBTQ people has changed over time, public support for the death penalty, how both citizens and members of Congress organize their opinions about politics, how people learn about politics, and how their knowledge influences their opinions and their behavior.  In the area of elections, he has investigated problems such as the nature of party realignment, how candidate quality affects voting decisions, and how voters respond to male and female candidates.

Professor Smith is currently working on projects addressing the politics of climate change, public knowledge about sustainability issues, and public support for the death penalty. 

Professor Smith received his Ph.D. in political science from U.C. Berkeley in 1982. After teaching at Brandeis University and Columbia University, he joined the U.C. Santa Barbara Political Science Department in 1986. In 1995-96, he directed U.C. Santa Barbara's Washington Center.

Specialization

American Politics, Environmental Politics, Public Opinion and Voting Behavior, Congress, Political Parties

Education

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley

Leah Stokes

Assistant Professor

stokes@polsci.ucsb.edu

 

Stokes works on energy, climate and environmental politics. Within American Politics, my work focuses on representation and public opinion; voting behavior; and public policy, particularly at the state level. Within environmental politics, she researches climate change, renewable energy, water and chemicals policy.

Specialization

American Politics, Energy and Environmental Politics, Public Policy, Methodology

Education

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Casey Walsh

Professor

walsh@anth.ucsb.edu

 

Specialization

Sociocultural Antropology, Political Economy, Mexico-United States Borderlines, Water, Commodities, History and Materialism

Education

Ph.D., New School for Social Research

M.A., New School for Social Research

B.A., University of California, Berkeley

Research

Casey Walsh's research falls into two general areas. The first is the anthropological political economy of the Mexico-US borderlands. He has studied the ways in which water, land and labor have been organized to produce commodities in areas marked by aridity, especially northern Mexico and the southwestern United States. This work took the form of a socioeconomic and cultural history (Building the Borderlands) of irrigated cotton agriculture in the borderlands, and in particular, northeastern Mexico. He has also studied the cultural, political and economic dimensions of how mineral springs have been used and managed, both in the past and present. Currently he works on finishing a book on that topic (Mexican Water Cultures). He has also become increasingly involved in the politics of groundwater management in California, and is also conducting a study of how new legislation - the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) - is being enacted in the Central Coast region of that state.

His research interests include perspectives that have developed outside of Europe and North America. He has dedicated a good deal of energy to tracing the histories of different traditions within Latin American Anthropology, and the ways in which anthropological thought has been applied to development. Particularly, he is interested in concepts of race and space, and how these have been utilized by states.